The good side to Myspace

My wife sent me this article last week (found it in her RSS feed :) )

Mourning on MySpace – Via CNN

People often say that being a ‘geek’ and being on the computer all the time must be a lonely life, but with the new interactive nature of the web, it’s the exact opposite.

MySpace avoids deleting the deceased’s profiles unless asked by family
members, which means the profiles-turned-memorials can stay active for
years. Other social-networking and blogging sites, such as Xanga and
LiveJournal, also host memorials tied to deceased users’ pages.

This article is a good one to share with students to show them the power of these connections you form on the Internet can be real and that “Pages live forever”

I’ve been trying to drive this concept home to my students. That the stuff they publish, even the stuff they forget about is still alive and well on the web. If their not going to listen to me, maybe they’ll listen to an article like this. It brings a whole new meaning to “What will people remember about me when I’m gone?” when your profile, articles, pictures, music, and videos are still alive and living in cyber-space.

A good reminder to all of us that our digital profile will out live us.

[tags]myspace, Web2.0[/tags]

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2 Comments

  1. Welcome back, Jeff.
    This is an interesting article and I agree it has the power to bring the message home! Thanks for the link. by the way i will be mentioning Teentek at CUE.

  2. I like to cover this topic when I discuss net saftey. My students seem to get it when we talk about future dates being able to Google before even meeting them.

    In a grad class we have been going over Habits of Mind and how to teach students to be self-directed. That includes self-monitoring and realizing how behavior impacts others. Tough idea to get across to teens living life on the web.

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