Web 2.0 Participation

I found this image at Personalize media. It is part of a post that is worth a read as well. Click on the image to enlarge and take some time to think about what they are talking about here. How does this apply to learning? Or does it? Where are our students? How do we get students to move through this continuum? Where should we be spending the majority of our time? Where should our...

Read More

A second look at zoho

A couple weeks ago I found a post by Tim Lauer where he described some web forms that he was creating using Zoho. It’s been a while since I played with Zoho and I have to say they’ve done some gerat improvements from the last time I was on the site. I played around the other night with Zoho Creator. I love the way you can customize a web form. I tried creating a web form for tech help where a teacher could fill out the form and when the ticket was active the teacher would receive an e-mail stating that the ticket was now active and the name of the technician that was working on the problem. Then when the ticket was closed by the technician it would again e-mail the teacher stating the ticket was not closed and what the outcome was. Now if only I could get it to translate from English to Chinese and back I’d be in business. 🙂 [tags]Zoho, Web 2.0[/tags] Technorati Tags:...

Read More

It's not about Web 2.0 it's about learning!

Today I had the pleasure of doing a short presentation for our IB Theory of Knowledge class. I was invited in to give a lesson on how knowledge is changing in the 21st century. My first thought was “How do I tell students knowledge has changed, when they already know that?” I set up 3 Skype accounts for students to login to and keep notes on. I did not want to only talk about how knowledge is changing I wanted them to experience it. To feel the power of collective note taking, the power of multiple perspectives on a subject or theory. The 3 Skype accounts where for 17 students making them anonymous. I figured that if they were  anonymous that the students would fell free to write more about what they were thinking, willing to take a risk and stretch their thinking. In the end the laptops didn’t have Skype installed (it’s part of our image but these were Science laptops and didn’t have the new image on them). But I did at the same time podcast the conversation (to be posted later) telling students that in this new world of knowledge, not only do you acquire it, but you then publish it for others to use as an information nod as well. I used George Siemens Connectivism Theory as a starting point and we went from there. I put together a little Wiki page for the students so as they do their homework assignment tonight they have the links that we talked about today. So here I was in the middle of teaching students about how knowledge has changed. How it is the connections that the Internet allows us to make that is changing knowledge and information acquisition, and at the same time thinking about the conversation that has been sparked by a recent techlearning post of mine. If you’re out of the loop on the conversation here’s a recap: 1. Fear Factor2. Teachers & Technology – a rant!3. Why teachers Don’t Use Web 2.0 – an historical perspective4. Why teachers Use Web 2.05. Stager, Logo and Web 2.06. Web 2 is Like Logo? And now this post. There are a lot of great quotes that I could take from all of these posts and they have all made me think. First off….logo? Seriously…I know the program was popular but I never saw it in school. I...

Read More

A Lesson in Connections

(Cross posted at Techlearning.com) I’ve learned a valuable lesson this week. One that shows the importance of teaching our students that the connections the web creates and the content you put on the web becomes a part of you. Last year, I was reading a lot about digital stories in the blogosphere. I saw some good examples of how they could be used in education and decided that I should try this whole digital story thing out for myself. At about the same time, YouTube was becoming more popular and I was intrigued by the power of this new social site. So I downloaded a free trial of Camtasia and set out to create my first digital story. I was still trying to wrap my head around Web 2.0 at the time and decided that a digital story on Web 2.0 would be a good start. So I went to Wikipedia, printed off the Web 2.0 article, did some editing to make it flow a little better, and used it for my script. I then went to the web and found pictures that matched what I was talking about and made, I thought at the time, a decent first attempt at a digital story. I created myself a YouTube account and shared it with the world. The video had received very little attention, only being viewed just over 1000 times in the last 14 months. That is until Michael Wesch of Kansas State University decided to post this video as a video response to my Web 2.0 video. I received an e-mail when he posted it and went to have a look. Like many others, I found the video to be very well done. I linked to it on The Thinking Stick to share with others and then didn’t give it another thought…until the next morning when I checked my e-mail to find 20 new people had subscribed to my Web 2.0 video. In the past week and a half, I’ve seen my first attempt of a digital story go from being a little unknown corner of YouTube to having over 48,000 views. Now my poor little attempt at creating a digital story is getting knocked around with comments. Michael’s video has surpassed 1 million views, but because his video is connected to my video, I’m getting visitors as well. We often forget about the power of connections on...

Read More