The March To Online Learning Continues

The March To Online Learning Continues

Just a quick post to point to two pieces of information that shows the slow march we’re seeing to online learning and how it is going to effect high schools in the near future. The disruption is near for sure. A small study done by Millenial Branding with college students shows that many believe they can get as good if not better education online. Here are some figures from the survey. 50 percent of students said they don’t need a traditional classroom to learn, but 78 percent do think that it’s easier to learn in a traditional classroom than online. (associationsnow.com) Not sure what to make of this. Is it a good thing or bad thing that 78% of students think it’s “easier” to learn in a traditional classroom? I have talked to people who have taken online courses and most do say they are more work as you can’t “hide” in an traditional class but not in an online course. I would have rather them say it was more educational or it was more “fun” to learn in a traditional classroom. Not sure what the questions were on the survey…but not sure I like “easier”. 43 percent say that online education will provide them with courses of the same or higher quality than traditional colleges. (associationsnow.com) So not all of them believe online is the way to go….but they do believe it is the way education is headed. There are some other good stats to look at in the survey. As this survey comes out asking millenials in college about online education, News. Corp’s Amplify launched a High School MOOC course. The first course is an AP Computer Science course and is aimed at preparing students to take the College Board exam. The online program, taught by an experienced high school teacher, is free to students. And an added option, called MOOC Local, which provides schools with students in the CS MOOC additional resources, will cost $200 per student but is free to schools for the first year. (gigaom.com) So if your school doesn’t offer AP Computer Science and you have students that want to take it, now they have a choice. The MOOC Local option looks like the future to me. Where a school has a “coach” who helps students when they need it, who can be that connection and even connect students within a school. Think how this could...

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Millennials and the Job Market

Millennials and the Job Market

There is a great article over at Mashable titled: Why Can’t Millennials Find Jobs? That as I read it I kept shaking my head and thinking about schools, education and where this is all going. What I want to do is add my own thoughts to the research the article points to. 66% not ready for workplace This is what companies are thinking? That our universities are producing graduates that are not prepared for the modern workplace? Why doesn’t this come as a surprise to me? It should…I should be, I don’t know, upset maybe? Kids going to school going 10s of thousands of dollars in debt for companies to say they are not prepared. You see the work force has changed. Of course many say it is this generation. That they feel entitled to having a job….yet A Pew Research Study shows Millennials are not entitled; rather, having a high-paying job is low on their list of priorities, underneath both helping others and being a good parent. But the one to me that I think is the easiest fix that K-12 can help with is this: 84% have not created a professional website or other positive online content which would improve online search results for their name. If you’re unaware how potential employers will perceive you online, try out Abine’s Hireability Calculator. Why is this? Why are students finished with 16+ years of education and this has slipped through the cracks? Simple….we never had to worry about it before. Before the Internet you were hired based on the resume you created and the interview you gave. There was no Google, Facebook, Twitter. You weren’t expected to have a professional website. Times have changed and are we preparing students to go out into the work force whether it be after high school or after college and compete in a competitive market? This screams to me once again why Facebook should be open in schools, why a graduation requirement for every senior should be to have a digital portfolio that is public on the web and controlled by them. We have been creating portfolios for years in education. Flipping the switch, moving it online and making it public is not that difficult. It means looking at things differently. It means understanding that the paper resume I practiced writing in business class all those years ago should be replaced (please tell me it...

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Growing Up Digital Presentation

A presentation to Middle School parents around technology and their children. Helping parents understand that today’s students are different. Their brains process information differently and the digital world they live in is different then the world we grew up in. Shift happens, and learning to deal with the changes facing our world and how to help your child be successful in it is something educators, parents, and the larger community need to work together on in harmony. Links for this presentation: Before viewing and listening to this portion of the presentation please visit The Fisch Bowl and download and watch Did You Know Books: The World Is Flat [Updated and Expanded]: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future Sites: www.myspace.com www.gliffy.com The audio is attached. It’s a 1 hour presentation and discussion with parents. You can download the Power Point Growing up Digital here. [tags]presentation, education, myspace, Internet safety, digital age, millennials[/tags] Technorati Tags: Jeff Utecht, Presentation, Education, myspace, internet safety, digital age, millennials, millennial...

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Looking into the eyes of our students

Friday was a half day at school. A little extended weekend for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Our High School took part in a couple different sessions. One of those sessions was by me giving a talk on “The Flat World”. I would have titled it “Your World” but the title doesn’t really matter. I had 20 minutes with every 9-12th grader at our school I started by saying, “You are very fortunate. You get to grow up in an amazing time in history.” I then played Karl Fisch’s Did You Know presentation with the follow slides added. There are 57 Million Blogs 100,000 new blogs created daily 1.3 million blog articles created daily That’s 54,000 articles being published every hour. Who’s verifying this information? Who’s telling the truth? Last year more students in China took the SAT in English than did so in the United States. The information comes from the latest report of the blogosphere from Technorati and from this update from Karl Fisch. After the PowerPoint was over we had a discussion about what all this information means. One student shouted “Shift Happens” the rest of the students laughed and I said “Exactly!” Another student spoke up and said “Everything we’re learning now doesn’t matter.” To which I said, “I know all your teachers standing around here are going to hate me, but you are absolutely right.” I then talked to them about the skills they need to learn while in high school starting with learning how to learn. We then talked about their generation. I asked the students “What’s the name of your generation?” a student spoke up and said “Millennials.” I then talked about the book Millennials Rising, and how in 1997 abcnews.com ran a poll on their website where this generation got to choose what to be called. They were proud of it, laughed, and thought it was cool. I asked them how many of them had a myspace.com account. To which over half raised their hands. I asked how many of them had a cell phone and a mp3 player. Every single student raised their hand. I asked how many had their own computer. All but a handful raised their hand, but when I asked who had access to the Internet in their house? Again it was 100%. I asked these questions for one reason and one reason only. I wanted the 20+ teachers...

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