Comments vs Compliments – a mini lesson

Comments vs Compliments – a mini lesson

Last week I had the pleasure of running a lab site in an Enumclaw 5th Grade class as part of my work with the district over the past couple of years. It’s a lesson that I first taught in 2009 and is still as relevant today as it was then. The students were working on opinion writing. They were writing in Google Docs which made it easy to have students peer edit with their editing partner. At the same time, there was an opportunity to have them experience commenting not just on someone you know and are in class with, but also learn to leave a comment on someone you don’t know and probably will never meet. That is a whole new level to commenting. So here’s the lesson….it took about an hour: Have students share their opinion writing with their editor buddy giving them “comment only” rights to their document. (Students in this class had shared their writing with their partner before….this time we change the permission to be “comment only”). Take time to read your partners writing and leave comments on their work. Now close your computer and have a discussion about the difference between a compliment and a comment. What a great conversation to have with students. We started listing what makes a compliment and what would be a good comment. The image to the left shows what the students came up with. We then talked about how you might give both to someone. Everyone likes compliments but they don’t really help the author with their writing. But if you make a compliment/comment sandwich you can do both! So we practiced in table groups what a good compliment/comment sandwich might sound like. An example: “I really enjoyed reading your post. I am wondering if you could add more details when you talk about the house. I couldn’t quite see it in my head. I really like the way your story ended, it made me laugh” The day before the lesson I went to Twitter and did a search for #comments4kids 5th to find 5th grade classrooms that were blogging and looking for comments from others. In no time at all, I found the two following classes: My 5th Graders Published Opinion Writing on @KidblogDotOrg and we are looking for some #comments4kids. #5thChat https://t.co/HxLCNfp27h pic.twitter.com/0aPVqVibaD — Mark Grundel (@MGrundel) January 10, 2017 Posts in Mr. Udy’s Class – Kidblog...

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