Knowing Knowledge Highlights 65-74

From George Siemens’ Knowing Knowledge: Change is happening on two levels: …the context in which knowledge occurs, and …the flow and characteristics of knowledge itself. pg. 69 Our society is being restructured to align with knowledge. The barriers, inhibitors, obstacles, and unnecessary structures are giving away to models which permit effective knowledge creating, dissemination, communication, personalization, and flow. pg. 69 The fault of many schools, universities, and companies is the unwillingness to listen to the voices of those closest to change pressures and emerging methods. pg. 70 Who are these people…our students? Do we listen to them? Do we watch how they interact, how they communicate? Or do we just continue to take away their cell phones, tell them to put the iPod back in their locker, and tell them to leave their laptops at home. Instead of listening to our students and learning what it means to be connected in this new digital age, we try to disconnect them and focus on information that is not interactive, up-to-date, and well….boring. People are able to connect, share, and create. We are co-creators, not knowledge consumers. Content generation is in the hands of the many. Co-creation is an expression of self…a sense of identity…ownership. We own who we are by the contributions we make. pg. 72 I agree. It’s one thing to watch YouTube it is another thing all together to create and upload a video to it. To have a video viewed over 100,000 times is very strange, and very cool. 70% of all YouTube registered users are in America. 50% of those are under the age of 20. Who’s creating this content? When are they finding the time to create it? And why are they not creating more of it during school? We expect to co-create and experience the two-way flow models of knowledge sharing and dissemination. Our identities are exposed, revealed for anyone to explore. pg. 72 Our identities are exposed and this is something I think we need to come to terms with. We want to keep students safe on the web, but we can’t allow fear to take over and break that two-way knowledge sharing. We want our students work to be out there exposed to the real world, part of the growing body of knowledge, but we don’t want our students out there…not sure we can have it both ways. We need to be...

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Knowing Knowledge Highlights 56-64

From George Siemens’ Knowing Knowledge: Tools of individuality serve a greater good to society than tools of purely collective traits.pg 56 When we experience knowledge in application, we leave theoretical understanding of knowledge. pg. 56 Our desires and logic are shaped in an orchestra of context: acting and reacting, negotiating and dialoguing. pg. 61 We value what is different more than what is known…it pulls on logic towards not-logic directions. pg. 63 We are contextually holistic. pg. 63 We connect more than we construct. pg 63 The oppressed in the digital divide: Those without access to tools of global conversations. Those without skills to contribute to global conversations. pg. 64 I like Siemens definition here at the end of oppressed. What does it mean to be oppressed in a digital world. Those without access and without the skills to contribute to a global conversation are at a disadvantage. As we become a global nation to ability to hold global conversations will be what separates the developing work from the developed world. China, India, and the UAE I think are three great example. Three countries that are working hard to become part of the “Globally Developed” world. Because of their access to tools and conversations these three developing 20th century countries are among the leading developed countries in the 21st Century. Siemens, G (2006). Knowing Knowledge. Lulu.com. [tags]knowing knowledge[/tags] Technorati Tags: Knowing Knowledge, George...

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Knowing Knowledge Highlights 46-55

From George Siemens’ Knowing Knowledge: Ultimately, whether online, face-to-face, or blended, learning and knowledge environments need to be democratic and diverse. A critical concept to keep in mind: The network and ecology must both be dynamic and capable of evolving, adapting, and responding to external change. pg. 47 Are our schools, and education in general, in a place that they can be seen as dynamic and capable of evolving? An interesting question. We were able to adapt and evolve to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) do to the pressures from the government. But if there was not money tied to the pressure to evolve would education have evolved on its own? I believe this could be part of the problem. We as humans do not evolve unless there is pressure applied to us to do so, and although we who are connected see the pressure to evolve, I do not think the typical teacher/school/district feels that pressure. That pressure only comes from us within the schools that are brining it to the attention of our administrators. There has been very little pressure put on the education system by corporations to change. Sure we see the reports, we hear Gates and others speak, but there is no pressure to change, therefore it does not happen. Learning is continual. pg. 47 The more connective a knowledge stream, the more valuable. pg. 50 So the more connections you can find to the knowledge the more valuable it is? Interesting…isn’t this the same theory some search engines use to do page rank? The more connections made to a page the more valuable that information must be, therefore the link gets pushed up the page rank? Knowledge moves too fast for learning to be only a product. pg. 51 I like this! Knowledge can never be a final project because of the rate of change. If knowledge can’t be a product, then it has to be a process in which you take an active role in developing and maintaining. How do you assess learning when learning is continual? Can we rely on standardized tests that focus on product to truly give us feedback on a process? If what is before us is too unlike what is within us, we are not capable of forming a connection. pg. 52 I think of teachers when I read this line. What lies before us in education is...

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Knowing Knowledge Highlights 41-45

During TV Turn Off week I was able to spend some quality time with Knowing Knowledge. The recent book by George Siemens. Here are my highlights and thoughts: Learning is mess and chaotic pg. 41 A great line that Brian Crosby from the Learning is Messy blog talks about constantly. Learning is messy, chaotic and spontaneous…that’s why I love it! Too often, we bend our pedagogy to the tool. pg. 41 Determining the tool and approach… Intended outcome Nature of the learning task Match task with appropriate medium Consider profile and needs of learners Meta-learning elements required (are we trying to teach content or process?) Diverse tools/spaces/ecologies pg. 41 I like this bulleted list. A great place to start when designing lessons that involve any tool, not just technology. The entire ecology of learning is the accurate whole. pg. 42 It is not content in general that we want. We want content that is current, relevant, and contextually appropriate. pg. 42 …when we create connections between content-we create a network or aggregation of different ideas…which adds meaning (pattern recognition) to the individual voices. Connections change content. pg. 43 Connections change content….I like that. Through the connections we make between learning nodes content changes. Reading a blog from Iraq, from a U.S. solider stationed there, and a newspaper article, your content changes because of the connections you have with these information nodes. Each node is a source of learning. Each new connection allows you to create personal learning for yourself within that context. Our relationship to content has to change when content creation accelerates. We can no longer consume all relevant content items. pg. 43 With my netvibes stating I have 707 unread items don’t I know this is the truth. If content has a short lifespan (as new information is acquired), then it would logically imply that our education and training systems should not be about content in particular-they should specifically be about current content. pg. 43 What we need to know is more important then what is known today. By only using written, published text are we supplying our learners with the most current content? Textbooks can be a historical resource, but can not, specifically in the field of science, be used as an example to teach what is currently known about a subject today. As the half life of knowledge continues to accelerate so must the tools...

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Offloading Knowledge

As I’ve been reading the book Knowing Knowledge the concept that George Siemens presents of offloading content and information into the network is finding a place with me. I’ve been thinking about this for days now and how my netvibes page has become my network of information. No longer do I have to learn something just in case, but instead the skill of being able to find information when I need it is what I need to learn how to do. Today was a great example. I’m getting a teacher all excited about creating digital stories. We were talking about me coming into the classroom to teach the students how to create the stories when I remembered that I really don’t know the ins and outs of Photostory3, the program we’ll be using. But I do know where to go to find that information. So a quick check of my PLN and my network of information and I found my del.icio.us bookmark to David Jakes Photostory 3 Tutorials. It’s this notion of offloading information into the network that makes, in my opinion, RSS feeds to be the #1 best web 2.0 tool for everyday users, and should be the #1 tool we start with when teaching teachers. Once you are connected to nods of information, and understanding how those nods create a personal network for you, do you take the next step and start becoming a nod for others. It would be interesting to see how many people started reading and collecting their nods of information before they became a nod themselves. I remember setting up a Bloglines account and adding feeds. Once I saw how amazingly cool this new tool was I was hooked and 3 weeks later I started this blog. I wanted to take this new network of information I was creating and add to it, remix thoughts, and add my voice to the conversation. Some people feel that way, others just read or read and comment using their network. Blogging isn’t for everyone (as much as I push everyone to do it) some people just don’t feel comfortable with it. (Fair enough, I don’t feel comfortable reading books) So as my first semester technology classes come to a close I’m starting to think about how I want second semester to run. I’m dropping Moodle all together in favor of the WordPress MU site I just...

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