Blogging, Classrooms, Clarence

Today I sat down with the 8th grade team who asked me to come in and talk about blogging. All 8th graders have blogs and all of the teachers now how blog. But “Now what?” I’ve only listened to half of Clarence Fisher’s Keynote for the k12online conference (Don’t want to ruin the LAN party fun!). He touches on how pedagogy has to change. Which is exactly what I told the 8th grade team today. I sat down with them. All of us with laptops in hand and started by saying “If you are not going to commit to blogging…really commit to it, it will fail.” I think that shocked them a little bit. I’ve set up more blogs for teachers than I can count. Some have been very successful while others have stopped using them after a week. What makes the difference is commitment. Not commitment to blogging or blogs, but commitment to changing your classroom…change the way things run, change the way things work, change your assignments. Lucky for me I have been thinking a lot about how to sustain blogging in the classroom as my k12online presentation on that subject is released on Thursday this week. It’s really no secret. You have to change the way your class runs, you can not add blogs to what you do, they have to become what you do! They have to become a learning tool, they can replace something you are already doing, or you will  have to rework your schedule to find a way to make them part of your classroom. Teachers need to understand that blogging is not journaling…journaling is journaling. Blogging is a conversation, blogging is a reflection of thinking, a creation of knowledge all done in an open come-one-come-all format. If you are not willing to change…then don’t blog! [tags]k12online07, blogging, pedagogy[/tags] Technorati Tags: k12online07cl01, k12online07, k12online2007, blogging, education,...

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K12online is back!

I read the call for proposals today and the first thing I did was run over to some of the people that were at my LAN parties last year and said…we’re on! Now just have to come up with what to present and how to present it before June 18th. I encourage everyone to throw your hat in the ring on this one, and if you live in Shanghai and you read this…stay tuned LAN party dates will be coming soon! Call for Proposals May 21st, 2007 Announcingthe second annual “K12 Online” conference for teachers, administratorsand educators around the world interested in the use of Web 2.0 toolsin classrooms and professional practice! This year’s conference isscheduled to be held over two weeks, October 15-19 and October 22-26 of2007, and will include a preconference keynote during the week ofOctober 8. This year’s conference theme is “Playing with Boundaries.” Acall for proposals is below. OVERVIEW: There will be four “conference strands”– two each week. Twopresentations will be published in each strand each day, Monday –Friday, so four new presentations will be available each day over thecourse of the two-weeks. Each presentation will be given in any of avariety of downloadable, web based formats and released via theconference blog (http://www.k12onlineconference.org/) and archived for posterity. FOUR STRANDS: Week 1 Strand A: Classroom 2.0 Leveraging the power of free online tools in an open, collaborative andtransparent atmosphere characterises teaching and learning in the 21stcentury. Teachers and students are contributing to the growing globalknowledge commons by publishing their work online. By sharing allstages of their learning students are beginning to appreciate the valueof life long learning that inheres in work that is in “perpetual beta.”This strand will explore how teachers and students are playing with theboundaries between instructors, learners and classrooms. Presentationswill also explore the practical pedagogical uses of online social tools(Web 2.0) giving concrete examples of how teachers are using the toolsin their classes. Strand B: New Tools Focusing on free tools, what are the “nuts and bolts” of using specificnew social media and collaborative tools for learning? This strandincludes two parts. Basic training is “how to” information on tool usein an educational setting, especially for newcomers. Advanced trainingis for teachers interested in new tools for learning, looking foradvanced technology training, seeking ideas for mashing tools together,and interested in web 2.0 assessment tools. As educators and studentsof all ages push the boundaries of learning,...

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